"Hospitality means primarily the creation of free space where the stranger can enter and become a friend instead of an enemy. Hospitality is not to change people, but to offer them space where change can take place. It is not to bring men and women over to our side, but to offer freedom not disturbed by dividing lines." - Henri Nouwen, Reaching Out
(Via gospelofthekingdom, frequencyofwords)

"Hospitality means primarily the creation of free space where the stranger can enter and become a friend instead of an enemy. Hospitality is not to change people, but to offer them space where change can take place. It is not to bring men and women over to our side, but to offer freedom not disturbed by dividing lines." - Henri Nouwen, Reaching Out

(Via gospelofthekingdomfrequencyofwords)

azspot:

“Personal” Relationship with Jesus?

Pretty fascinating.

CHILDREN’S MINISTRY FOR THE CHILDREN’S MINISTRY-CHALLENGED

everydayimpastoring:

image

Never again. 

Well, I know what I want for Christmas.

This is an awesome charity I just found out about today. It’s called Preemptive Love, and it specifically focuses on helping children in Iraq get the heart surgeries they need—because Iraqi children are TEN TIMES more likely to be born with congenital heart defects than the worldwide average rate.

Why is the Iraqi rate of birth defects so high? Well, it comes down to three big reasons:

Of the many factors that contribute to this rate in Iraq, the top three suspects that are distinct from those of nearby countries are:

1) The chemical agents, attacks and experiments of Saddam Hussein’s regime on Kurds and Shiite Arabs.

2) Depleted Uranium used by the US and British forces left behind a chemically toxic legacy in the soil and gene pool of those exposed in combat and in post-combat daily life.

3) The sanctions imposed on Iraq, crippling the economy and destroying all infrastructure, including health care.

Click here for more information on these top three suspects.

So yeah, two out of those three reasons have to do with American foreign policy.

Now, as I’ve written beforeI never supported war in Iraq in any sense more meaningful than a 15-year-old’s ingenuous assumption that the president wouldn’t screw up so important an issue. But even if these birth defects aren’t my fault, they’re not entirely disconnected from me, either. At the very least, my (unwillingly paid) taxes helped make them happen.

More important, as a Christian, if this isn’t helping the “least of these,” I don’t know what is.

So this is what I want for Christmas, and what I may get for others who, like me, are already pretty much set as far as material stuff goes. (And, ok, I might like a nice sweater, too.)

I know it’s not even Halloween yet, but if you’re into giving people something meaningful and righting some of the wrongs of American interventionism, maybe add Preemptive Love to your Christmas list.

Also, if you can spare money now, they’re “waging peace” by helping Iraqi refugees fleeing ISIS. Learn about that emergency initiative here.

One dare not assume that such nonviolent resistance would have reduced the tyranny or even the suffering of the period. A Christian pacifist cannot promise that the way of the cross will be effective in any given situation. She or he cannot assume that the pacifist way will be widely accepted. There does remain the faith that the way of the cross is the right response and that, if it is tried, God may use it for the best of all. There is an attitude of patience involved here. One lives in the faith that the evil regimes do have within them the seeds of their own destruction. […] But one cannot depend on such political analyses. For we can never know the answer to the ‘what if’ questions of the past or the future. We can trust in his way in hope that this is the way.
Two Monks Invent Christian Denominations

But seriously click through and read them all.

On a really simple technical level, it’s not an ideal comparison. Drones aren’t omniscient: one of the reasons where there’s a serious civilian casualty count in the US drone campaign in Pakistan is that it’s hard for drone cameras to distinguish civilians from legitimate targets at altitude.

credo [ˈkɾeːdoː] — a statement of belief; Latin: "I believe."